Dear Chery I lost your gemstone!

Author channel Y'Boy Caleko   4 мес. назад
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Closed! Flooded! 45 foot down a Mine Shaft! Topaz, Garnet and Amazonite! Morefield mine 2018

In this adventure I visit the Morefield mine in Amelia CourtHouse Virginia and go deep underground to get a lesson in Geology! MoreField Mine Website http://www.morefieldgemmine.com/ Do you have Dig ideas? DigIdeas@gemdigs.com Get your gems at Mining America's shop on Etsy. https://www.etsy.com/shop/MiningAmerica Support Mining America https://patreon.com/user?u=3979473 To Support upcoming digs paypal.me/MiningAmerica Mining America FB page https://www.facebook.com/MiningAmerica/ Mining America Fb group https://www.facebook.com/groups/1132467800137603/ Mining America Store on youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpHaMMaZ-HL7OkmhF49VpRw Twitter @CalekoDj Mailing address Not Available at this time Credits ‘Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com)’

How to Cast Silver and Gold Jewellery using the Delft Clay casting system

One afternoon Andrew was casting some solid gold balls to go on a torque bangle he was making. He decided to quickly grab a point and shoot vlogging camera and made this quick film. It shows you the techniques involved in using the Delft Clay casting system available world wide. You can achieve superb results first time once you under stand the principles. Andrew shows you how. So, want to learn more about jewellery making, tools, tip and tricks? Visit http://www.AtTheBench.com Andrew's on line jewellery making website that has over 1000 films on all things jewellery making

My Daily Life in the SLUMS OF MUMBAI (Life-Changing 5 Days)

Two and a half years ago, during my first visit in India, I spent 2 days walking all around the slums of Mumbai. Even though I got to learn quite a bit about the life in the slums, I didn’t have the chance to live inside the slums and because of that I left with more questions than answers. So now that I came back to India for the second time, I decided to go back to Mumbai and spend five days living in Dharavi, which is one of the largest slums in the world. This experience opened my eyes in ways I couldn’t have imagined, because I got to spend so much time with the local people, who completely transformed my outlook on what their lives were like. You see, as most outsiders, I had a very distorted view of the people of the slums. We grow up hearing stories about them dying on the streets, no one being able to read and write, kids having to sleep surrounded by flesh-eating rats and so on. There are, of course, tons of problems that need to be addressed, especially when it comes to sanitation. For example, sources say that in Dharavi there is an average of 1 toilet for a thousand people. Also, livestock generally lives in the same quarters with people and that, combined with the fact that the local water sources lack cleaning facilities, sometimes causes the spread of contagious diseases. However, people there are just like everywhere else. They have their own dreams, goals, careers, thoughts and emotions. They are in no way different from the rest of us. It doesn’t matter where we come from. We are all equal. Some of us are born with golden spoons in our mouths, others are not. But that doesn’t define us. What defines us is our pursuit of happiness, our compassion for others and our ability to adapt to whatever circumstances we’re in and make the best of them. Subscribe! Instagram ► https://instagram.com/jacoblaukaitis/ YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/c/JacobLaukaitis Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/JacobLaukaitis I always purchase my travel insurance here: https://bit.ly/2HKfanJ I get all of my music from here: https://bit.ly/2KaGNqG Sources used: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dharavi http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/spl/hi/world/06/dharavi_slum/html/dharavi_slum_intro.stm https://www.proptiger.com/guide/post/7-facts-you-probably-did-not-know-about-dharavi Huge thanks to Danulis Macijauskas (https://www.instagram.com/danulis/) for editing this video and to Urtė Laukaitytė for her feedback and advice on how to tell this story properly.

Making 24K Gold

Title says it, Another process of gold. Good luck trying it.

13 Rarest Gemstones and Minerals Ever Seen

Here are the 13 most rare and valuable gemstones and minerals ever seen in the world like the blye Benitoite and red diamonds! Subscribe for new videos Monday Wednesday and Friday! 8. Jeremejevite This mineral was discovered way back in 1883 by a French mineralogist named Augustin Alexis Damour, who named it after the Russian scientist Pavel Vladimirovich Eremeev. The crystal was found on Mt. Soktui in Siberia, Russia. Since then, it has been described as being found in the Eifel District of Germany and in the Pamir Mountains in Namibia. This rare aluminum borate mineral is comprised of variable hydroxide and fluoride ions. 7. Poudretteite This mineral was first found during the mid-1960’s in the Poudrette quarry of Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec. However, it wasn’t until 1987 that the poudretteite was fully recognized as a new mineral. Even then, this mineral wasn't described in depth until 2003. As stated by several different sources, it’s believed that only a relative few will ever come into contact with this mineral and let alone ever even hear it mentioned. 6. Grandidierite This is considered to be an extremely rare mineral and gem that was first seen in 1902 on the Island of Madagascar. It was named in honor after the French explorer Alfred Grandidier who once studied the island’s natural history. Grandidierite comes in a bluish-green color and is located almost entirely in Madagascar, although, there was a clean faceted sample that was found in Sri Lanka. Grandidierite is also pleochroic, which means it's able to absorb different wavelengths of light differently and that results in different colors, such is the same ability with the gems tanzanite and alexandrite. 5. Painite This gemstone was first discovered back in the 1950’s in Myanmar by a British mineralogist named Arthur C. D. Pain. For the next several decades only two fragments of the hexagonal mineral were known to exist on earth. By the time the year 2005 rolled around, there were still less than 25 discovered pieces of painite and The Guinness Book of World Records had declared it the world's rarest gemstone mineral. However, that was 11 years ago and since then the origin of the original stones has been found, along with two other major locations that have led to the discovery of thousands of small samples of painite fragments. Even so, they’re still considered one of the world’s rarest minerals. 4. Red Beryl Also known as bixbite, "red emerald", or "scarlet emerald", red beryl was first reported as far back as 1904. Even though its chemical compound is closely similar to that of aquamarines and emeralds, it’s actually considered to be rarer than both of them. What gives the mineral its red color palette is thanks to the presence of ManganeseⅢ+ ions. It can be found in parts of New Mexico and Utah where it’s actually proven to be quite difficult to mine. Because of this, prices for red beryl are known to reach high levels and have even gone on to be around 10,000 per karat for stones. 3. Ammolite This rare gemstone can be found mainly in the eastern region of the Rocky Mountains of North America. Ammolite is an opal-like gemstone that is solely made up of the fossilized shells of extinct animals known as ammonites. This makes ammolite one of the few biogenic gemstones that exist, along with pearls and amber. Ammolites weren’t officially recognized as gemstones until 1981 when they were given official status by the World Jewellery Confederation. That’s also the same year that commercial mining for ammolite began. 2. Tanzanite It’s been said that tanzanite is 1,000 times rarer than a diamond, which might as well be the case considering the fact that it can be found almost entirely near the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro. This is where the perfect conditions lie in order to form the mineral. Like grandidierite, tanzanite is able to produce striking shifts in color based on the crystal’s orientation and the certain lighting conditions. Caltech's geology division states this is because the color variations are caused by the existence of vanadium ions. 1. Red Diamonds Did you know that diamonds come in a variety of colors? In fact, diamonds can range from being yellow, brown, colorless, blue, green, black, pink, orange, and red. That’s also the same order of how rare each diamond is classified as with yellow being the least and red being the most. Not only that but diamonds are also the hardest natural substances that form here on earth. Just like the colorless diamond, the red diamond is made purely out of carbon, however, what gives the diamond its red color is actually a deformation of their atomic structure that’s known as a “plastic deformation”. The Moussaieff Red is the largest red diamond in the world among the little known other red diamonds that have been discovered.

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