The Stalemate Trick That Could Have Changed Chess History

Author channel GM Huschenbeth   2 мес. назад
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What a Pawn Wants, What a Pawn Needs | The Secret Life of Pawns - GM Yasser Seirawan

Grandmaster Yasser Seirawan shows examples of increasingly difficult pawn breakthroughs. Even when the position looks perfectly symmetrical there are ways to get a passed pawn. 2018.04.05

Amazing Piece Sacrifice to Get a Powerful Central Pawn Storm

If you would like to learn about creativity in chess, necessary factor of your progress and more, you can download the FREE e-book "How to Succeed in Chess" - https://goo.gl/ESYGXN Often chess players ask “When can I sacrifice a piece? Why some sacrifices don’t lead to checkmates? What kind of advantage is an appropriate compensation for a piece sacrifice?”. If you have similar questions, this video is for you! In the following video lesson prepared by RCA guest coach IM Asaf Givon, he explains about those pieces sacrifices that are made in order to achieve a specific strategic goal. Even more specifically, he explains about piece sacrifices that strive to achieve pawn majority in the center – or in other words, a big and very powerful central pawn storm. ♕ You can download the PGN of this game at the end of this blog-post - https://goo.gl/5Nw3xm ♕ How to analyze your games (FREE course): https://goo.gl/6k258e ♕ Quick success in chess (FREE course): https://goo.gl/7x1dSN ♕ Chess Training Plan for Rapid Improvement (FREE course): https://goo.gl/Nigo8D ♕ Secrets of Strong Chess Players (FREE course): https://goo.gl/pF5uUv ♕ Chess Courses and videos: https://goo.gl/Ew9SoX

Chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov Replays His Four Most Memorable Games | The New Yorker

The grandmaster Garry Kasparov, considered by many to be the greatest chess player of all time, replays some of his most unforgettable games. He relives both the happiest and the most painful moments of his career, including: Garry Kasparov vs. Anatoly Karpov: World Championship Match 1985 Garry Kasparov vs. Anatoly Karpov: World Championship Match 1987 Garry Kasparov vs. Viswanathan Anand: PCA-GP Credit Suisse Rapid Final Blitz Playoff 1996 Garry Kasparov vs. Deep Blue: I.B.M. Man vs. Machine 1997 Correction: At minute 3:55, the rook at H8 is highlighted as attacked by the white queen. The rook at C8 should be highlighted instead. Garry Kasparov now teaches chess on MasterClass: https://www.MasterClass.com/gk Still haven’t subscribed to The New Yorker on YouTube ►► http://bit.ly/newyorkeryoutubesub Chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov Replays His Four Most Memorable Games | The New Yorker

The London System - More Dangerous Than You Think | Game Analysis

Get my tactics eBook for beginners here (free): http://bit.ly/tactics-ebook In the 14th round of the German Bundesliga, I played with the White pieces against IM Andrey Ostrovskiy, rated 2433. I surprised my opponent with the London System, an opening I had only played twice prior to this game (find my game against GM Bluebaum below). We followed my preparation for a long time until my opponent made a good practical decision to keep the position closed. The middlegame was very complex and we both made inaccuracies. Suddenly, I had a chance to go for an attack against my opponent's king. Now, the question was whether my opponent could rattle up counterplay in time... See my game against GM Bluebaum, also with the London System: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbjBgprpgkI See my game from round 13, against GM Hertneck: https://youtu.be/Gvse_flm9aI You can play through the game with engine evaluation here: https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/schachbundesliga-2017-2018/14/8/3 Grandmaster Analysis Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgtWsdyLNS02zPlEmKMzzRnqg9YIbJymU Thanks to Georgios Souleidis for the picture in the thumbnail! My goal is to become the best chess channel on YouTube. You can help me achieve this by giving me feedback and suggestions in the comments. And also, of course, by subscribing to my channel :) https://www.youtube.com/user/nichus2012?sub_confirmation=1 If you find my videos entertaining and (more importantly) useful, you can show your appreciation with a small donation via PayPal. Thank you :) Link to PayPal donation: https://www.paypal.me/GMHuschenbeth People often ask me which chess books to read. Here is my comprehensive list of recommended chess resources: https://www.amazon.com/shop/gmhuschenbeth Let's stay in touch :) ▶Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/nichus2012?sub_confirmation=1 ▶Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1M9PnQX ▶Website: http://www.niclas-huschenbeth.de ▶Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/gm_huschenbeth ▶Twitter: https://twitter.com/GM_Huschenbeth ▶Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/GMHuschenbeth --------------------------------------------------------- Niclas Huschenbeth (born February 29, 1992 in Hann. Muenden) is a German Chess Grandmaster. Huschenbeth learned how to play chess at the age of five and participated in youth chess tournaments. He was awarded the title of International Master in 2008 and the Grandmaster title in 2012. At age 18, he achieved his most notable success, becoming the youngest German Champion in history. He has played 52 times for the German national team and participated in two chess olympiads. Currently, Huschenbeth studies industrial/organizational psychology at the Free University of Berlin.

Biggest Blunder in Chess History - Karpov vs Bareev - Linares (1994)

I forgot to turn off my Facebook, so there are a couple of message sounds in the video. Sorry about that :) Anatoly Karpov vs Evgeny Bareev Linares (1994), Linares ESP, rd 2, Feb-?? French Defense: Tarrasch Variation. Open System (C07) 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. ed5 ed5 5. Ngf3 Nf6 6. Bb5 Bd7 7. Bd7 Nbd7 8. O-O Be7 9. dc5 Nc5 10. Nd4 Qd7 11. N2f3 O-O 12. Bf4 Rfe8 13. Re1 Bf8 14. Ne5 Qa4 15. c3 Qa6 16. Qe2 Qe2 17. Re2 Bd6 18. Nd7 Bf4 19. Re8 Re8 20. Nc5 Bc7 21. Nd3 Bb6 22. Nb3 Kf8 23. Rd1 a5 24. Kf1 Rc8 25. Nd2 a4 26. a3 g5 27. Nf3 g4 28. Nh4 d4 29. cd4 Bd4 30. Nf5 Bb6 31. Nb4 Ne4 32. f3 gf3 33. gf3 Nc5 34. h4 Rd8 35. Rd5 Ba7 36. Rd8# The 12th Annual Linares Super Tournament held from February 23rd to March 14th, 1994 was the first Category XVIII event ever held. Fourteen of the world's best players, including both World Champions, competed in a round robin format. The participants were (in order of Elo): Garry Kasparov (2805), Anatoli Karpov (2740), Alexey Shirov (2715), Vishwanathan Anand (2715), Vladimir Kramnik (2710), Vassily Ivanchuk (2710), Gata Kamsky (2695), Boris Gelfand (2685), Evgeny Bareev (2685), Alexander Beliavsky (2650), Veselin Topalov (2640), Judit Polgar (2630), Joel Lautier (2625), and Miguel Illescas-Cordoba (2590). When asked about the strength of the tournament, Kasparov famously stated that the winner could consider himself the world champion of tournament chess. Ironically, it was to be Karpov, his longtime rival, who would be the man of destiny, culminating in the greatest single tournament performance of all time! Karpov won the whole ball of wax, undefeated with an astonishing 11/13!!! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If you realllly enjoy my content, you're welcome to support me and my channel with a small donation via PayPal. Link to PayPal donation https://www.paypal.me/agadmator Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/agadmatoryoutube Twitter: https://twitter.com/agadmator Lichess: agadmator Chess.com: agadmator Skype: agadmator League of Legends: agadmator :) Hearthstone: agadmator

In the World Chess Championship 1987, then World Champion Garry Kasparov was trailing one point as he played the final game against Anatoly Karpov. Kasparov needed to win this game to remain World Champion. We take a look at the final position when Karpov resigned as there was one last trap he could have set. Kasparov and Karpov both noted that they had missed this stalemate idea. Kasparov would retain his World Championship title until 2000 when he lost in a match against Vladimir Kramnik.

Here's a video clip of the last moments of the game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sW6lRpAcN-w&feature=related

You can play through the game here: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1067242

Remarkable Games Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgtWsdyLNS02Pu-3WKm_p7_b7vg5ndUaR

Thanks to Lennart Ootes for letting me use his fabulous pictures! Also thanks to Suyk, Koen, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22593354 !

My goal is to become the best chess channel on YouTube. You can help me achieve this by giving me feedback and suggestions in the comments. And also, of course, by subscribing to my channel :) https://www.youtube.com/user/nichus2012?sub_confirmation=1

If you find my videos entertaining and (more importantly) useful, you can show your appreciation with a small donation via PayPal. Thank you :)

Link to PayPal donation: https://www.paypal.me/GMHuschenbeth

People often ask me which chess books to read. Here is my comprehensive list of recommended chess resources: https://www.amazon.com/shop/gmhuschenbeth

Let's stay in touch :)

▶Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/nichus2012?sub_confirmation=1
▶Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1M9PnQX
▶Website: http://www.niclas-huschenbeth.de
▶Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/gm_huschenbeth
▶Twitter: https://twitter.com/GM_Huschenbeth
▶Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/GMHuschenbeth
---------------------------------------------------------
Niclas Huschenbeth (born February 29, 1992 in Hann. Muenden) is a German Chess Grandmaster. Huschenbeth learned how to play chess at the age of five and participated in youth chess tournaments. He was awarded the title of International Master in 2008 and the Grandmaster title in 2012. At age 18, he achieved his most notable success, becoming the youngest German Champion in history. He has played 52 times for the German national team and participated in two chess olympiads. Currently, Huschenbeth studies industrial/organizational psychology at the Free University of Berlin.

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